The Bitcoin Renaissance: Evangelism Through Art

In 2015, two artists wanted to fix the disconnect between Bitcoin and the general population. The Italian natives, Valentina Picozzi and Claudia Lagorio, started Satoshigallery, which spreads the message of cryptocurrency through imagery, art, and wearables.

Also read: Interview With Bitcoin Graphic Artist Phneep

 Satoshigallery Brings Bitcoin to Life with Art

logiSatoshigallery’s creators love Bitcoin so much they were inspired to start a project that gives an iconographic landscape that embraced the values Satoshi Nakamoto brought to the world.

Picozzi gives our readers some insight to why they started this project and the philosophy behind it:

I discovered bitcoin in early 2012 and got more and more involved as I met more people within the industry and was able to learn from them. I was so enthusiastic about it, I was talking about bitcoin to everybody.—But whenever I was trying to go further we came to a point where it was too difficult for them—that’s where I came to the idea that Bitcoin needed art. Art should be used to describe historical revolutions, thanks to Satoshi we are in the middle of a technological one.


The artists’ products can be currently be found at’s store with a wide variety of pieces that encompass Satoshi quotes and excerpts from the original Bitcoin white paper. From posters to t-shirts, the artists have created pieces that were made with “decentralized love.” Additionally, the group is paying homage to the first Bitcoin transaction by shipping products in a gift box that resembles Papa John’s pizza boxes.

Satoshigallery t-shirts are environmentally conscious, and all of them are made with 100% organic cotton and screen printed with earth-friendly dyes.

Slogans on posters say things like, “Can’t remember my private key” to “There are ten types of people in the world. Those who understand binary and those who don’t.”

One particularly funny product has the face of Craig Wright mixed with Marilyn Monroe’s hair and makeup in a classic Andy Warhol fashion.

Picozzi says that portraying the foundations of Bitcoin through art is hard at times. “It’s a difficult task,” he says, “especially because when people think about Bitcoin the first image that comes to their mind is its logo, but Bitcoin is much more than an orange ‘B.’” 

Art, Picozzi explains, can bridge the gap between geeks, hackers, developers and everyday people. Being born in the age of the digital revolution, Lagorio considers herself a “son of a bit” or a daughter in her case with a “chip heart.”


Readers of can head over to our store and see the vast array of graphic material this organization of artists has to offer. The artists say that Bitcoin’s first application is the currency but with their take on this cryptocurrency revolution, it can be a whole lot more than that.

What do you think about Satoshigallery’s artwork? Let us know in the comments below.

Images courtesy of Satoshigallery